Author: siobhan

#worldoceansday 5 Sustainable Fashion Brands That Protect Our Oceans

This #WorldOceansDay and beyond we want to share with you some of the devastating issues that our blue plant is facing and showcase incredible sustainable fashion brands we stock at FAIR that are trying to change things and reduce these impacts.

We also have a special window display featuring a poster from Pier 2 Pier, our local beach clean organisation, as part of their poster campaign to get people re-thinking before they leave their rubbish behind on the beach. 

Ghost fishing nets

By 2050 we could have more plastic in the ocean than fishes

Abandoned plastic fishing nets are a having significant impacts when it comes to devastating environmental impacts.  Not only are they part of a fishing industry that is responsible for fishing way more fishes than necessary, they are also a massive part of  our planet’s ocean pollution problem. They frequently get lost in our oceans and seas, becoming ‘Ghost Nets’ and a further threat to marine life. 

Ghost nets make up 48% of the waste deposited at the great Pacific Garbage Patch. Drifting nets entangle and kill marine life like seals, turtles, sea mammals and fish. 

Ruby Moon Gym To Swim made from ghost fishing nets

One brand we stock at FAIR who are working hard to help clean up ghost nets in the ocean is not for profit active wear brand Ruby Moon Gym to Swim. They upcycle this harmful by product of the fishing industry in something lovely: swimwear and active wear for the sustainable fashion lover.

They have also reduced their impact in other ways incorporating the sustainable development goals into everything that they do from ethical and low impact production to empowering women through micro loans in 14 developing countries. 

All their active wear pieces are made from ECONYL® nylon yarn from used fishing nets and other regenerated material. Their fabrics also use waste reducing printing and dying techniques, and certified Oekotex and vegan-meaning no harmful chemicals are used.

You can shop Ruby Moon in store from £45

 

Plastic pollution and micro plastics

Approximately 51 trillion microscopic pieces of plastic, weighing 269,000 tons are in our rivers, seas and oceans

An upside to making things out of plastic is it’s strength, however in our society that champions single use,  it is also its biggest weakness. Plastic bags in our everyday life take 10-1000 years to decompose. It never disappears, instead it breaks down into smaller pieces until it becomes invisible to the naked eye and too small to be filtered out.

Only 8% of the plastic produced is recycled. Plastic is everywhere, and has a habit of finding itself adrift in our rivers, seas and oceans, being ingested by marine life and is causing mutations and death when ingested.

Approximately 51 trillion microscopic pieces of plastic, weighing 269,000 tons. That is about the same as 1345 adult blue whales and 500 times the number of stars in our galaxy. 

Pale Eyewear and Care4Basket turning plastic into wealth not waste

Another brand we stock at FAIR who are working to clean up our plastic pollution problem are Care4Basket who have teamed up with PALA Eye wear, our gorgeous ethical sunglasses brand, to make cases using recycled plastic bags.

They work with local craftspeople in Ghana utilising their traditional weaving techniques to reduce plastic waste and keep plastic out of the oceans and out of our eco systems.

You can shop Pala Eyewear here or try on and buy in store from £70. 

Littering on the beaches

At least 8 million pieces of plastic are entering the oceans every single day.

Two-thirds of this is said to comes straight from land based sources e.g. litter being left on the beach or washed down rivers and drains, and litter being dropped in towns and cities. It also comes from industry spills, badly managed landfill sites and bins near the coast and also by being flushed down the toilet. The rest made up from plastic that is lost at sea such as ghost fishing nets. 

Although it’s not just beach littering, the amount of litter found on UK beaches has more than doubled in the last 15 years! Most of this litter will not naturally biodegrade for hundreds of years and when it does it often leaves behind toxic chemicals and micro-plastics etc. in the meantime it is left to be ingested by or trap and harm animals of whom the beach and oceans their home.     

Artist, Irene Soler raising awareness of littering on the beaches

To bring awareness to the massive production of plastic, Irene Soler created Brighton Beach Souvenirs: postcards picturing litter and beach waste found by her on Brighton beach.

She collected objects during her walks on the beach in front of her home in Kemptown and presented her findings in this shocking photo series. Not only are the things she found really bizarre, just sheer amount is mind boggling. One picture represents just one walk on the beach. 

You can buy a pack of postcards in our shop for £4.50

It's not just a plastic problem

42% of 18 to 24-year-olds admit to leaving litter behind after a visit to beach

Although plastics consistently make up 60 to 90% of marine litter found on beaches, lots of other things are left littered on beaches which do not naturally biodegrade. Clothing, disposable BBQs, glass bottles, cans and many more things also have big impacts too.

According to Keep Britain Tidy almost one in five people admit to leaving rubbish behind at the beach, with a whopping 42% of 18 to 24-year-olds admitting to leaving litter behind after a visit to the beach.

37% of marine litter comes directly from the public. This is why It’s so important to make sure we  Refuse, Reduce, Reuse & Recycle and take whatever packaging or litter we do create home with us or safely into a bin. 

Turtle Warrior bracelets made from glass cleared from turtle nests

To help clean up the littering problem at their local beaches in Trinidad and Tabago, Nature Seekers make these beautiful Turtle Warrior bracelets from recycled glass cleared from local turtle nesting spots.

Globally all species of sea turtle found in Trinidad and Tobago are classified as Vulnerable and is considered at high risk of extinction in the wild and it’s important to keep their nesting areas clean and safe. 

They also reinvest profits toward sea turtles conservation efforts and raise awareness of the importance of protecting the homes of animals we love.

You can buy a Turtle Warrior bracelet in your favourite colour on our website here or from the shop. 

Species becoming extinct

The pollution of our oceans is causing species extinction

A recent study authored by researchers at Plymouth University showed that a staggering 700 different marine species are threatened by the presence of the vast amount of litter in the ocean, especially plastic and this also plays a role in rising extinction.

Research found that 693 species had been documented as having encountered plastic debris, with nearly 400 involving entanglement and ingestion. Between entanglement, ingestion and ecosystem damage, the threat of plastic pollution impacts marine species both large and small.

It’s not just pollution, it’s also really important to raise awareness of over fishing, exploiting them through poaching and also u unnecessarily entangling marine life in finishing nets etc.  

BBC Earth X People Tree 'Our Blue Planet' T-Shirts and Tote bBags

To highlight the devastating effects our unsustainable practises are having on so many species across the planet , BBC Earth partnered with People Tree to create this amazing collection of organic cotton t-shirts and tote bags. Their campaign aims to raise awareness about the importance of looking after ‘Our Blue Planet’, spotlighting two of the most loved and endangered species are the North Atlantic right whales and the sea turtles.

Both of these suffer from plastic pollution, over fishing practices and global warming.

They are also also made from Fairtrade certified GOTS organic cotton. 

We are commited to reducing our impact as much, creating as little waste as possible and helping clean up the beaches – Pier 2 Pier Beach Cleans are currently doing a poster campaign around the city and we are supporting them with our window display – featuring their ‘Slam Dunk The Junk’ poster over the next week or so, so please do pop down and have a look and support them however you can. 

We’ve also been sharing our 5 sustainable tips to protect the oceans on our social media too – head on over to our Instagram or Facebook to take a look.

FAIR’S 12 Years to Change and 12 Changes to Make

12 YEARS TO CHANGE AND 12 CHANGES TO MAKE

Why 12 years to change?

“We have 12 years according to climate scientists to act on climate change and global warming before the world, as we know it is lost” (8/10/2018, Will Gore, The Independent).

What can we do to reverse climate change?

It can seem a little daunting, however there is no need to be a hero to save the planet and we can all do in our everyday lives that will collectively have a big impact. To help you on your sustainable living journey, we want to share with you some easy businesses and services that put people and planet first, for a greener and fairer planet.

[1] FOOD: SUSTAINABLY SOURCED, FAIR TRADE & TACKLING WASTE

We are big advocates of buying sustainably sourced, seasonal, locally grown and package free food as much as possible. Organic food is not only great for the planet it’s also great for your health – reducing the impacts of pesticides, GMO’s and chemicals on our eco systems and our bodies.

Fair Trade supports better prices, decent working conditions, local sustainability, and fair terms of trade for farmers and workers in the developing world. 

Locally sourced means you’re reducing the distance from farm to table, you get predominently seasonal veg which is cheaper for you and better for the environment and you’re supporting local farmers.

Package and plastic free shopping from bulk stores and markets is the best way to reduce single use packaging waste, and you can use re-fillable produce bags or paper bags if you have to.  It also means you can get the exact quantity you want.

Another way you can reduce food waste is using and supporting schemes like the Real Junk Food project and Fair Share Sussex who tackle food waste by putting surplus to good use.

We also reccomend making the most of the Refill campaign – which allows you to refill your water bottle for free at any of the locations that have signed up. Just look out for a sticker 

Some of the local food shops and organisations we’d recommend are:

HarrietsOfHove/ InfinityFoodsRetail/BhFood, FareShareSussex/WasteNotShop/Hisbe/Refill Campaign

[2] CLOTHING: PROMOTING ETHICS,  SUSTAINABILITY AND LONGEVITY

The textile industry is the 2nd most polluting in the world. But in order to change the situation we have to ungergo a collective mindset shift towards clothing and the way we shop. In the words of Vivienne Westwood “buy less, choose well and make it last” .

Fast fashion is built on unsustainable practises which have a huge impact on the environment and people across the globe. It uses up many and causes far more than it’s fair share on pollution.  It also encourages us to buy more clothing than we need, at prices which aren’t fair or sustainable.

This is why it’s important for us to slow down and value our clothing more, prioritising second hand and clothing made in a sustainable way.

When buying new look out for durable clothing made from sustainable materials, in as zero waste way as possible, under fair conditions.

We also encourage you all to elongate the life of your clothing, taking it to local repair shops and repair cafes or mending things yourself. 

Here are some local sustainable fashion shops and businesses we’d reccomend:

TheFairShop, PrelovedofBrighton, BrightonRepairCafe, LoveThatStuff, Smarter-Uniforms, Vintage and Secondhand shops, The Revival Collective, Lucy&Yak, Flock, The Zipyard, Ayten Gasson, Fold. You can also find more local sustainable fashions shops on Revival Collective’s Ethical Fashion Map of Brighton

[3] ENERGY: SOURCES FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY

Energy definitely plays a big role when it comes to global warming and it’s important to opt for energy from renewable resources over fossil fuels coal, oil and natural gas wherever you can. Because of the immense time spans to create coal, oil and natural gas, they are classed as non-renewable sources of energy.

They also emit a huge amount of carbon dioxide when they are burnt as fuel, a greenhouse gases that contributes to global warming. 

From wind turbines to solar panels, there are many businesses out there that are championing cleaner, greener and renewable sources of power and energy that don’t come at the cost of our planet and have a much lower environmental impact than conventional energy technologies.

Check out these alternatives for greener energy for your home and business:

Ecotricity, GoodEnergy, BHESCO, Octopus Energy, Bio Bean Coffee Logs from Moksha Caffe 

[4] TRANSPORT: LOW CARBON EMISSIONS

It might not always be possible but whenever you can use public transportation, bike, or share a car. There are plenty of second hand bikes out there in very good condition and at a low price.

CharityBikeShopDitchling, BtnBikeShare, Carshares, Public Transport

[5] COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGY

 You can take action by keeping your electronic devices as long as they last and repair then whenever it is possible.

Did you know that your internet researches could support good actions? Change your search engine for one that plants trees or support local projects.

Fairphone, ThePhoneCoop, Ecotalk, Ecosia, TechTakeBack, RepairCafe

 

[6] SUSTAINABLE GIFTS

Not only is it nice to treat our loved ones but also share some values that are meaningful for you, for them and for the planet.

HeartsAndFlowersBrighton, Uoecospa, TheFairShop, FlockBrighton

 

[7] RE-USE AND RECYCLING

Before looking for new goods, why not check that there aren’t any out there that could be reused?

And also don’t throw things away into landfill, look for ways you can re-use or recycle them.

Smarter-Uniforms, Freegle, The Green Centre, 

 

[8] BANKING & INSURANCE

 Choose a bank or an insurance company that invests your money in green projects that does good to the environment and that supports local entrepreneurs.

Triodos, Naturesave, Positive Money, Move Your Money

 

[9] SOCIALISING

Check these lovely places that use local and ethically sourced ingredients.

 SiloBrighton, EarthAndStarsBrighton, Moshimo, LongHouseCafe

[10] COMMUNITY PROJECTS TO GET INVOLVED WITH

If you have some free time and would love to get involved in meaningful projects and meet people who share the same values join of of these amazing communities.

TrashTalk, Pier2PierBeachClean, RealJunkfoodProject, EcoBricksBrighton, Refill Campaign

[11] FURNITURE, HOMEWARE & HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS

 Household cleaning products are often very harmful not only to the environment but also to your own health due to the amount of chemicals they contain! If you followed the 10 previous tips you don’t want to ruin your efforts by bringing lots of chemicals into your house.

It is getting trendy to buy second hand furniture. Not only does it allow you to find that rare antic drawer that will ad a great touch of style to your interior but it has probably also already gotten rid of its chemical particles from the wood treatment, the polish, etc.

 Emmaus, Shabitat, HarrietsOfHove, WasteNotShop, Hisbe, Georganics, Organic Gardens

[12] HAIRDRESSERS

 The products used by the hairdressers can be really aggressive to your skin, your scalp and the environment.

Here is a list of hairdressers who use natural products to take care of you and the planet.

CuttleFisheCoSalonsBananaLouisHairStudioJaponicaHair

How Can We Afford to Buy Ethical and Sustainable Clothing?

 
 

When you first start looking at ethical and sustainable clothing you might think, like I did ‘I can’t afford to buy these clothes’. However the more I learned about how most of the clothes on the high street are made the less I wanted to support these cruel and harmful ways of production. Even if a company was showing signs of trying to make improvements it just didn’t feel right or acceptable that people and the environment were currently suffering for my purchases.

Rewind 12 years back when I was a student sitting in my flatmate’s/shopping buddy’s bedroom. She was crying, complaining that she had nothing to wear and staring at her triple wardrobe full of clothes most of which we picked up in sales while browsing the shops after uni, which happened several times a week. She broke down saying that she has all these clothes but they are all rubbish. I thought how is it possible that she doesn’t like any of them? I too had built up quite a collection myself of random sale items. I remember looking down at myself one day thinking this outfit is awful, such a mismatch and not in a good way. I just put it down to not having an ‘eye for fashion’. 

 

Over the following years I gradually slowed down on my thoughtless impulse shopping, I made myself more aware of what I already had and began to edit down my wardrobe. I had bought a lot. I got rid of a lot, giving to charity things that I had hardly worn. I had more than I could possibly wear plus I had things that I couldn’t wear, that just were not practical for me, my shape or my lifestyle.

I later became more aware of ethical issues. Torn between the idea of spending more than I usually would on an item or buying an unethical product I ended up barely buying anything at all. I walked past shop windows refusing to be enticed by their big sales or individual items that caught my eye. I didn’t really need to do a lot more shopping but there were a few simple items I was missing, like jeans that fitted well, comfortable shoes and jumpers that were actually warm. Eventually I gave myself an allowance of £50 a month to spend ethically. If something was over £50 I would have to save up for the following month.

I put a lot of thought into my one purchase of the month, spending the whole of the rest of the month considering the next. Fast forward about a year and I have an amazing pair of MUD Jeans that I don’t want to take off at the end of the day, I want to wear every day and actually pretty much can as they don’t need to go in the wash after just one wear like many of my previous trousers. I have a couple of beautiful jumpers from People Tree that go with practically any outfit I wear. I have several soft organic cotton long sleeve base layer tops by Thought and one from Unoa. They are all so nice and comfy I wear them every chance I get.

I’m sure there are many others who shop like I used to, buying multiple ‘bargain’ items. I think most people probably have more clothes than they need, how else could so many high street stores be in business? Have you noticed how there are so many more clothes shops for women and the women’s sections are much bigger yet there aren’t a load of men walking around naked? Maybe we shop too much? That’s not to say some men don’t also have more than they need. How can these big high street stores and brands be so successful with huge profits when their prices are so low? Perhaps it’s because it’s a lot easier to get you to spend £10 ten times than it is to get you to spend £70 in one go.

Mass consumption of clothing is a relatively new thing. Clothes were not always as cheap in relation to our earnings, as we know them to be today. Sustainable and ethical clothing is seen as expensive, but it is merely what it costs to make and to keep the businesses going, there are no huge profits. You get better quality materials and workers are paid fairly for their work. Think of how much time it would take you to make an item of clothing, add the cost of the material to the value of your time and I think you will begin to ask ‘how can all the other clothes be so cheap?’

 

I originally decided to shop for ethical and sustainable clothing because I was concerned with the way workers were treated, their working conditions and how chemicals used in the production of materials affected the environment and peoples homes in the areas where they were made. I had not even begun to realise the benefits it would have on myself. My clothes feel so nice and comfortable. I know in my head they are made from lovely materials that don’t cause harm to the environment, no one has suffered to produce them, which makes me feel good about wearing them. Each piece is thoughtfully selected so I cherish and care for them and will wear them to death (which may take a while as they seem to last well). I actually save a lot of money by buying a lot less and getting more wears out of each item. My amount of washing each week has drastically reduced.  I have more space in my home. It’s quicker and easier to find an outfit in the morning and people have actually started complimenting me on what I wear!

So before you decide that ethical and sustainable clothing is too expensive for you, take a look in your wardrobe, start to add it up and see if you are getting your money’s worth. You might find you can’t afford not to buy ethical!

Guest Blog by Jenny Rolfe Herbert, Brighton UK  Instagram: @jrolfeh

World Factory – interactive theatre show in Brighton

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After a sold out and extended run at the Young Vic during 2015, World Factory  METIS’s latest interactive theatre show – returns with performances in Cambridge (Cambridge Festival of Ideas), Manchester and our home town Brighton. Just a week away from showing in Brighton, we thought we’d share our excitement for this immersive game- making theatre which spotlights what actually goes on behind the scenes during the process of mass production.

World Factory pulls the curtains back on how small decisions contribute to a much bigger picture of exploitation. This isn’t a show about where you buy your clothes, but rather about the global system in which we all live,” said World Factory co-creator, ZoeSvendsen.

The show offers audience members business insight, as they are given opportunities to make decisions that will affect revenue, commodities and quality of life. Through a scenario-based card game; audience members become factory managers of a Chinese clothing factory, where they must reckon with what success looks like, while considering profits, products and workers.

“…at a time when citizen engagement with economic issues is becoming increasingly vital for the maintenance of meaningful democracy, World Factory is an excellent way to encourage people to think about the economy in a systemic and nuanced way,” said author and economist, Ha-Joon Chang.

World Factory interweaves real-life accounts of mass production – both here and abroad – with a moving score, video and live performance. The level of audience participation however, is up to each individual’s discretion.

In addition to theatre, METIS has extended their World Factory vision and have gone further, creating their own shirt, which has a barcode that you scan with your phone to reveal the people and processes involved in its production.

World Factory runs from 18 October – 10 December in Cambridge, Brighton and Manchester.

Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts, BrightonPerformances: Tuesday 15 November – Friday 18 November 2016

See Tickets to book

Box Office: 01273 678822

HOME, Manchester

Performances: Wednesday 7 December – Saturday 10 December 2016

See Tickets to book

Box Office: 0161 200 1500

http://metisarts.co.uk/world-factory/

 

 

‘The True Cost’- A Fashion Documentary Movie

search     We wanted to give you a heads up about a great educational film that has just premiered in New York, ‘The True Cost’ Daily News Washington says ‘ Don’t expect easy answers from “The True Cost,” but expect to feel like you need to find some, and urgently.’ We hope that this film will help to start opening peoples eyes to the real repercussions behind our over-consumption and we would love for you to help spread the word too.

Watch the trailer to this very moving film

Here’s a link to their site where you can watch the whole thing

Swishing at FAIR! June 2015

Another exciting Date for your Diary: 13th June

Here at FAIR we believe in ethical fashion in all senses. For this reason, we’d love to introduce you to Rags Revival. An amazing chance to swap in those garments that have been hiding in the back of your wardrobe for something you may just fall in love with.  For £5 you can bring up to 10 items of clothing or accessories to swap! From experience, we can safely say there are always plenty of gems to be swapped! We will also be offering you lovely swishers 10% off all clothing at FAIR from 11am-7pm. Do come and join in the fabulous fun!

Check out more details on the facebook event

https://www.facebook.com/events/968932539824094/

or to know more about swishing with Rag Revival have a peek at their website

http://swishing.wix.com/rags-revival

 

 

 

 

 

Pop-up Shoe Shop at FAIR May-June 2015

Coming up at FAIR…

 Date for your Diary: 30th May

The brilliant shoes of Bourgeois Boheme will be making an appearance in FAIR! We will be holding a Pop Up event from 12-4pm on the 30th May, as we are sure you will love BoBo shoes as much as we do! Check out their website below for a preview of the type of selection we will have in store. There will also be healthy drinks and nibbles on offer as you browse. If you’re fancying a lovely outfit to go with your new shoes, you’re in luck! FAIR will also be offering 10% off all clothing to all BoBo customers!

http://www.bboheme.com/blog/popping-up-in-brighton/

 

 

With the election just passed…’Who should have the power?’

With the election just passed, we have been regularly asked ‘who should have the power?’ When it comes to creating an ethical world, here at FAIR we believe you have the power. Every five years we elect a new government, but the real change of the World will come from you. As consumers we hold just as much, if not more power, the power for positive change. Fairtrade food has become a household name, but what about the other things we do daily? Each day we get dressed, we should think of where our clothes come from, where or energy comes from, think of where most things we use and consume come from. We know it’s easier not to ask questions, but if you don’t, who will? A small change to your daily life can make a monumental positive affect.

Here is a video showing why we need to think more about where our cotton comes from.

http://thecottonfilm.com/

We can make a change in so many ways, from shopping Fair Trade, or if your purse is a little tighter, shopping vintage or even attending swish nights such as Rags Revival here in Brighton.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1OSJQ1t1ZM

If we change our habits when it comes to shopping, we can still treat ourselves, but with the added benefit of knowing we are helping the World.

Be the change you want to see. Feel the power you have, for just being you.

 

World Fair Trade Day 9/5/2015: Be an Agent for Change

BE an agent for CHANGE: buimgresy FAIR TRADE

World Fair Trade Day: the inclusive worldwide festival celebrating Fair Trade as a tangible contribution to the fight against poverty, exploitation, climate change and the economic crisis

With World Fair Trade Day on the 9th of May, we wanted to share with you some great things Fair Trade has brought about.

People Tree is just one of the brands we stock that is certified Fair Trade. With Fair Trade pay and working conditions, People Tree has been supporting Kumbeshwar Technical School helping 260 children go to school as well as running a health scheme for all workers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PLk2MDKPQQmXMusyMJsBh_V1Ln52mnK-Sw&t=136&v=XWnwskwPEC0

Bombolulu supplies the beautiful Fair Trade jewellery we supply in store. They are also responsible for the wheelchair campaign, using the profits made through the sale of their jewellery, they aim to supply every disabled child in Kenya with a wheelchair.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3x0Up7NNydU

By buying organic cotton products, you are supporting the families of cotton farmers around the globe. The usual pay for the cotton fibre has decreased dramatically, without the price of production following the same trend. This is leaving cotton farmers in a state of desperation, even to the extent of taking their own lives as too many already have. By buying Organic Fair Trade cotton products, you are ensuring that this doesn’t happen, that farmers are paid the correct amount to provide for their family without being forced to use environmentally harmful pesticides to increase their yield.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEHAszUjiRc

So please we encourage you to celebrate all that is Fair Trade, especially on 9th of May!